prevent a bad trip

Psychoactive substances have been used for thousands of years by spiritual teachers and seekers as a medium for connecting to unseen stimuli. Modern psychotherapy is beginning to recognize the benefits of using psychedelics for treating many mental illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD.

Over the last decade, the western world has increasingly grown interested in Shamanic entheogens such as Ayahuasca, a psychoactive drink made naturally from the Ayahuasca root vine.

Psychedelics allow users to explore the depths of their consciousness in the most introspective ways. It can be incredibly useful in overcoming past trauma and spiritual evolution. However, it is important to be aware of the psychological harm it can cause if taken in the wrong manner.

This video by Jonathon Twiz meticulously explains all the steps you can take to prevent yourself from having a bad trip. His psychedelic harm reduction video will help anyone who wants to explore their spiritual side with the help of psychoactive substances. Below is a brief summary of the content discussed in his video.

The first thing to keep in mind is the environment that you are doing the psychedelic. Always make sure that your environment is safe, clean, and free of clutter. If your environment is not clean, it could infiltrate your experience and cause anxiety. Nature is a great way to immerse yourself in a positive and peaceful environment. Another option is to lay in bed while listening to relaxation music. Make sure your room is clean and free of clutter.

Inexperienced psychedelic users should always have a sitter. A sitter is someone who is not in an altered state of consciousness and is there to keep you safe while you are exploring your mind.

Do a mental assessment and understand that if you are going through a tough time in your life, the trauma from this may resurface in your experience. Psychedelics aren’t an escape from reality. It is an altered state of reality, but not an escape. Psychedelics have a way throwing significant experiences back into your face with added emotion and empathy attached to it. This can be a bad experience for you or it can be very therapeutic depending on how you are processing it and how you construct your perspective. It is recommended to meditate for 5 minutes prior to entering a psychedelic state so you can relieve any tension that is in your mind and body.

If you feel a bad trip coming, don’t forget that you can talk to your experience as if it was an entity. You can get great results simply by telling it “Show me something different, take me somewhere else”. Simply repeating this in your mind is enough to trigger a pivotal shift toward a positive direction during your experience.



You can also have a safe word, which is anything that you associate with positivity such as a mantra, your mother’s name, your favorite destination, etc. I use the word “Light” whenever I feel a bad trip coming on. Not only do I say the word in my head, but I try to visualize light breaking through the cracks of my bad trip.

Finally it’s important to realize that sometimes a bad trip can be incredibly therapeutic for you. It can help you process emotions and experiences from a more introspective point of view. I have walked out of bad trips with a more complete sense of self and responsibility, which has helped put an end to some negative patterns of behavior.

Psychoactive substances aren’t for everyone, and you should never solely rely on them to enter deep altered meditative states of consciousness. It is an additional and optional tool to use in our ever-expanding conscious evolution. If you have never used entheogens, remember the lessons of this video as they will guide you in the right direction towards a positive experience.

You can download more resources for Psychedelic Harm Reduction At: jonathontwiz.com



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Jonathon Twiz
Jonathon Twiz, a self-proclaimed psychonaut, a lover of creating music, a contemplator of physics and the unseen world. He stands by the Socratic philosophy that "the unexamined life is not worth living." Follow him at: jtwiz.com Tweet him @jtwiz
Jonathon Twiz

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