quiet people

Quiet people have their own talents, attributes and traits, which may be different from those of extroverts, but are nonetheless valuable.

To have a great relationship with a quiet person, whether as a partner, friend or colleague, it can be helpful to understand how they are different from more outgoing folk.

Here are ten things your quiet friends might like you to know.

1. Quiet people aren’t conceited or snobbish.

We may not be the first to speak at a party or engage in social chit-chat when we pass you at the photocopier, but that doesn’t mean we are conceited, it’s just that we tend to speak only when we can think of something important or meaningful to share. Bear with us, once we find a topic we are passionate about we have plenty to say.

2. Quiet people aren’t anti-social.

We might not accept every invitation, or stay up until the small hours dancing and drinking, but we love people. It’s just that we prefer one-to-one conversations or small groups where we can develop meaningful relationships. Once we make friends we are kind, passionate and extremely loyal.

3. Quiet people aren’t boring.

We can be as lively and exuberant as the next person. Once we get to know you, it may surprise you how vivacious we can be. We do take a lot of things seriously, but we can also be irreverent and fun.

4. Quiet people can be loud.

Believe me, when we are relaxed, happy and surrounded by people we care about, we can be the life and soul of the party – just try shutting us up once we get onto a subject we are passionate about, or the DJ is playing our favourite tune.

5. Quiet people can be great listeners.

If you want someone to really listen to your troubles, ideas and dreams: find a quiet person. Quiet people are usually interested in others and genuinely care about their feelings. Plus, quiet people don’t like gossip so they can be trusted with your deepest secrets.

6. Quiet people won’t steal the limelight.

If you like being in the centre of attention, then you need some quiet friends. They aren’t likely to vie for centre stage and draw attention away from you. They will sit back and happily let you be the life and soul of the party, as people watching is one of their favourite hobbies.

7. Quiet people aren’t lonely.

Quiet people enjoy their own company and while they like to socialise, they don’t want to do it all the time. Don’t worry about your quiet friend being lonely, he or she is probably just enjoying a good book or movie or daydreaming happily somewhere peaceful.

8. Quiet people aren’t miserable.

Quiet people may refuse an invitation or just sit back and let others talk, but that doesn’t mean we are miserable. We just have different ways of enjoying ourselves than more gregarious folks. And sometimes, we just need some peace and quiet in order to recharge our batteries.

9. Quiet people think before they leap or speak.

Quiet people often like to get more information before making a decision or think things over before they speak. So, don’t be surprised if your quiet friend pauses in a conversation, takes a while to respond to a message or asks to get back to you over an invitation.

10. Quiet people are creative.

Quiet people often have a rich, inner life and can be creative and insightful. They are enthused by other people’s ideas and are great people to turn to if you want to discuss creative ideas of your own.

You may be surprised by how much your quiet friends can enhance your life and by what their quiet personalities bring to your world. In embracing our different personalities, quiet and outgoing, we can complement one another adding different values and alternative perspectives to each other’s lives.

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Kirstie Pursey

Kirstie Pursey

Kirstie is a freelance writer and blogger with a Diploma in Creative Writing from the Open University. She lives on the outskirts of London with her family of people, dogs and cats. Kirstie is a lover of reading, writing, being in nature, fairy lights, candles, firesides and afternoon tea. She loves to explore new ideas, particularly those related to psychology, spirituality and storytelling.