3 weird questions you can’t answer about human body and mind

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falling in a dreamThree simple questions will be answered in the following article. Maybe you never wondered about these things or thought you knew the right answers. In any case, it will be quite interesting for you to learn them.

Question 1: Why do I often experience deja vu?

We all know what deja vu is: an obscure feeling that makes us believe that an event we are experiencing now has already happened in the past. This phenomenon occurs more often in people who suffer from migraines (especially if the pain is localized in temples), which often cause nerve excitability in parts of the brain that control memory. The result is

the sense of having previously experienced an event or a situation that is occurring at the moment.

Question 2: Why do I have a falling sensation just before falling asleep?

Experts call it “hypnagogic jerk” and some scientists believe that it is the way our body tries to keep us awake. For example, if you are extremely sleepy and someone is speaking to you, then you can feel the hypnagogic jerk. But it also happens when you fall into your bed to get some sleep: while you have already fallen asleep, some external noises cause stimuli in the brain and as a result you see yourself falling down and wake up immediately.

Question 3: Why can’t I tickle myself?

When someone tickles us we startle and start laughing and shuddering. This happens because of stimulation of nerve endings in the skin, while the feeling of tingling is generated in the central nervous system. If we tickle ourselves, it will not work as the most important element is missing – the startle.

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Anna LeMind

Anna is the founder and lead editor of the website Learning-mind.com. She is passionate about learning new things and reflecting on thought-provoking ideas. She writes about science, psychology and other related topics. She is particularly interested in topics regarding introversion, consciousness and subconscious, perception, human mind's potential, as well as the nature of reality and the universe.




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By | 2017-01-13T21:55:15+00:00 October 8th, 2012|Categories: Psychology & Mental Health, Uncommon Science, Weird & Unbelievable Facts|Tags: , , |4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. thomas May 15, 2013 at 10:54 am - Reply

    Deja vu is a result of your eyes registering what you are seeing at different moments in time. Your eyes normally receive this information simultaneously, but are sometimes off by an infinitely small fraction of a second. This time difference causes your brain to interpret the image twice, which gives the sensation of having deja vu.

    We can in fact tickle ourselves. Our fingers have more nerve endings for touch sensations than many other locations on the body. When trying to tickle yourself, the brain registers far more signaling from your fingers than the location being tickled, and thus suppresses those signals, resulting in no “tickle response”

  2. Usman July 3, 2013 at 9:54 am - Reply

    Well, I can tickle my feet.
    But why can’t rest of the body? I don’t know even I feel slight sensation but not like when someone else does so.

    If I don’t want none can tickle me.

  3. RainboLight September 25, 2013 at 10:01 pm - Reply

    I can “turn off” the tickling sensation at will most of the time. I can choose whether or not I would like to tickle myself, it isn’t always effective on the trunk of my body, but extremities become very prone to “self tickling.” Especially: back of neck, back of arms, inside knees and other infrequently contacted areas of skin.
    Sometimes the roof of my mouth becomes so over-sensitive and ticklish that I can’t speak, eat or move my tongue without the sensation becoming overwhelming; similar to the “pins and needles” feeling when your leg “falls asleep.” This sensory loop requires a few minutes of sit still meditation, falling asleep, or a very engaging distraction to overcome.

  4. rhonda lewis February 24, 2015 at 11:14 pm - Reply

    I had a conversation with a friend about dejavu and he made an interesting point about this phenomenon.when we were younger as I am 57 now we had alot more of these moments these dejavus and as we age those moments become like a big feeling of either being right or wrong , intuition if you will. He said that when young we have just incarnated to this life and we still had fresh memories from past lives and as we get older they become long moments of intuition I thought this was an interesting view on this

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