If you are interested in personality tests, you may have come across the DISC Personality Types. But what are they and which one best describes you?

The DISC Personality Types differ slightly from other personality tests. This is because they focus on human emotions and behaviour when categorising, rather than character traits.

The four human primary emotions and their corresponding DISC Personality Types are D for Dominance, I for Influence, S for Steadiness and C for Conscientiousness.

Four Basic DISC Personality Types

Dominance

Emphasis on getting results

  • Confident and assertive
  • Forceful and direct
  • Blunt in approach
  • Will accept a challenge
  • Strong-willed and fast-paced
  • Likes to get to the point quickly
  • Can see the bigger picture
  • Gets results

Influence

Emphasis on persuading

  • Enthusiastic and lively
  • Sociable
  • Outgoing
  • Optimistic
  • Accepting of others
  • Collaborative
  • Likes to participate
  • Not good on their own

Steadiness

Emphasis on cooperating

  • Kind-hearted
  • Gentle nature
  • Sincere and accommodating
  • Supportive of others
  • Calm and relaxed
  • Dependable
  • Slower paced
  • Doesn’t like to be rushed

Conscientiousness

Emphasis on quality

  • Independent
  • Private
  • Objective
  • Logical in nature
  • Detail-orientated
  • Likes to reason
  • Analytical
  • Doesn’t like to be wrong

DISC Personality Types in More Detail

D – Dominance

dominance

A person who scores highly on the D personality type is likely to be decisive, direct, assertive and highly competitive. As such, they are motivated by winning and getting results. They love a new challenge and are proactive. Those with a D style are results-driven and strive for success. However, they can be demanding and are often described as driven individuals. They live life in the fast lane and are impatient.

D – Strengths

D styles come into their own in the workplace. For example, they prefer leadership roles or at least, jobs where they have the freedom to do what they want. They like being their own boss and are self-confident enough to start up their own companies. Their downfall is that their impatience to push for results might alienate some of their less confident work employees.

D – Weaknesses

There’s not much that D style personalities fear, however, they will worry about others taking advantage of them. As they are extremely logical people they sometimes overlook emotions and this can make them seem cold and unfeeling to loved ones. They are also very fast-paced individuals and like high-risk activities. As a result, they can find it hard to relax.

D – Communication

Dominant personality types are direct and to the point. As such, they won’t engage in small talk, and they certainly don’t do banter. Subsequently, they will want to get to the subject as quickly as possible. As they see the wider picture, they may even want to skirt around the smaller details. When talking to a D style personality make sure you are satisfied that you’ve covered everything.

Qualities a D Style Personality could improve on

Dominant personality could up their sensitivity levels a little when dealing with people. They are very impatient by nature so learning to be patient would allow them to focus on the smaller details which they sometimes miss. In addition, it would help them with relaxation.

I – Influence

disc personality types influence

Someone with an I style personality is optimistic, enthusiastic, charismatic and trustworthy. For instance, they are motivated by positive social change and good relationships. Likewise, I types love to collaborate with others and are warm, good-natured people. They value democracy and freedom of speech over results.

I – Strengths

This type makes convincing strategists and can sell snow to Eskimos. Therefore, it stands to reason that if their intentions are good their influence will have a positive impact. Furthermore, I types make great mentors as they are excellent at coaching and counselling.

I – Weaknesses

These types can act on impulsive and have a tendency to be disorganised. They are good at starting a new project. However, unlike D types who will finish it through, I types may struggle. Because they rely on their influence having such an important effect, they don’t like being ignored.

I – Communication

I types are the most talkative bunch of all the DISC Personality types. They are engaging and sociable and love to chat. You can tell an I type because they will be making large gestures using their hands and arms. However, although they love a good chinwag, they do have a problem when it comes to making big decisions.

Qualities an I Style Personality could improve on

I types styles take on too much and have a tendency then to procrastinate. Even though they start a lot of challenges, they don’t end up completing all of them. They could do with staying focused for the duration of a project until completion.

S – Steadiness

steadiness

People with the S style like to cooperate and support others and are calm and patient whilst doing so. They prefer stability and are not fans of change. They’re predictable by nature and will maintain the status quo. They value loyalty and work to accommodate and help others.

S – Strengths

If you need help and support, ask an S style personality. They won’t ask questions and will go out of their way to assist you. They are stable and solid types you can rely on. You’ll never see these types throwing hissy fits or tantrums because they didn’t get their own way.

S – Weaknesses

Sometimes S style types don’t think of themselves enough. For example, they can be too accommodating and be taken for granted, or even for a ride. Because they don’t want to offend others they can end up saying yes to things they really don’t want to do, or simply can’t do.

S – Communication

S styles are great meditators and perfect in these roles. They are polite and softly-spoken and good where a controlled environment is necessary. However, the S type will not interrupt in case they upset others.

Qualities an S Style Personality could improve on

S types need to focus on themselves more and find their own voice. They shouldn’t be afraid of confrontation and learn to build their self-esteem. If they can get used to changes more often they will also be able to adapt more readily.

C – Conscientiousness

conscientiousness

C styles are analytical types who use their expertise and logic to ensure accurate results. They seize opportunities where they can gain further knowledge to better themselves. When it comes to working, they are systematic and critical. For instance, they use their methodical nature to produce quality work.

C – Strengths

These are diligent individuals that set themselves a high bar when it comes to excellence. So if you want detail-orientated employees that will push themselves, then opt for C types. C types are innovative thinkers and use logic, not emotion when making a decision. They work well independently for long periods so you don’t need to keep checking up on them.

C – Weaknesses

Because C types demand excellence from themselves, they also expect it of others. Yet this makes them appear overly critical and cold. Also, they can also come across as robotic and stoic. In other words, not much fun to be with.

C – Communication

These are the ‘facts and figures’ people. They talk about data and statistics and logical conclusions. In fact, you won’t get much small talk or banter from them. They like analysing the smallest details but also have a tendency to think they are right.

Qualities a C Style Personality could improve on

C styles would do well to chill out a little and let their hair down once in a while. Moreover, they should also learn to delegate tasks and not think that they are the only ones qualified to carry out important work.

So, did you discover which four DISC Personality Types you most resemble? You can find out exactly which one you are by taking the test. You never know, you might be surprised at the results.

References:

  1. https://www.123test.com
  2. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org
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