the myth of the bermuda triangle

It has been a popular movie theme in the sixties and seventies and a major subject of research for scientists over the past years. What is eventually the truth behind the Bermuda Triangle story?

The Bermuda Triangle, also known as Devil’s Triangle, is an area in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean, where ships and airplanes have mysteriously disappeared. This region is bounded by three vertices: Miami (Florida), San Juan (Puerto Rico) and the mid-Atlantic island of Bermuda. The phrase “Bermuda Triangle” was created in 1964 by American author Vincent Gaddis in pulp magazine Argosy. Ten years later, American linguist and language teacher Charles Berlitz, known for his books on paranormal phenomena, attempted to link the Bermuda Triangle to the legend of lost Atlantis, which, according to Berlitz, was located undersea in the very same area. His theory was developed in his bestselling homonymous book “The Bermuda Triangle”.

Based on Berlitz’s theory, several writers suggested that “crystal energies” released by the mythical city in this area was the reason ships and airplanes disappeared. Others referred to time portals and underwater extraterrestrial bases, a geomagnetic anomaly that causes navigational problems or huge tidal waves. Another theory offered an explanation based on geology: pockets of flammable methane gas under the sea destroyed both ships and airplanes. However, such an incident has never been known to happen.

Journalist Larry Kusche in his book “The Bermuda Triangle Mystery – Solved” questioned previous research and believed there is no mystery in the Bermuda Triangle. Kusche made contacts with the Coast Guard, the Air Force, Lloyd’s of London, and other agencies and obtained microfilm copies of newspapers from cities where various incidents had been reported. After collecting all the information he could find on each incident and examining the facts, he reached the conclusion that the story was created by mistakes and, in some cases, was highly unlikely to happen. He concluded that records of the ships and planes claimed to have been lost in the Triangle never existed or ships and planes disappeared far outside the Bermuda Triangle.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters and the Naval Historical Center, logical explanations indicate the obvious: the Bermuda Triangle is a heavily traveled area on the ocean. Moreover, the Gulf Stream is extremely swift and turbulent and the Caribbean-Atlantic weather is extremely unpredictable. This, along with the deep ocean floor and the strong currents developed various navigational hazards. As a result, common sense has once more proven that the countless theories that excite human mind have been beaten by natural forces and human logic.

References

  1. http://www.livescience.com/23435-bermuda-triangle.html
  2. http://www.livescience.com/32240-is-the-bermuda-triangle-really-dangerous.html
  3. http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/infopage/bermudat.htm

art by ErikShoemaker



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Rena

Rena

I am a History major, who loves art, travelling and nature. Photography and music make my life exciting. I love learning new languages and cultures. Over the past 5 years, I have been working as a translator and writer.