georgia guidestones

One of the strangest monuments in America is the Georgia Guidestones at the top of a hill in Elbert County, Georgia.

It is comprised of four tablets surrounding a central pedestal with a top cap above the monument. Each of the four tablets has the same message inscribed on both faces, covering 8 distinct languages, which are mentioned later in this article.

One interesting aspect of this monument is its apparent astrological function in four separate capacities, which an astronomer from the University of Georgia was contracted to help integrate. The first of these four that I’d like to mention is the hole in the center column through which onlookers can see the north star. The second relevant point is that the four outer tablets are oriented in a manner which marks the lunar declination cycle. Additionally, there is a slot through the center pillar which is aligned with the Sun’s solstices and equinoxes. Finally, the capstone features an aperture which allows sun rays to pass through at noon every day and shines a beam on the center stone in a different position depending on the day of the year.

The mystery surrounding this monument is loosely based in controversy, and strongly based in anonymity. Those who funded the project and contracted Elberton Granite to construct this “Doomsday Monument” were self-proclaimed as “a small group of Americans who seek the age of reason.” The commissioner and designer of this project identified himself as R.C. Christian, which was not his real name, and only divulged his real name to Mr. Martin, the president of Granite City Bank, for the sake of processing funding; at this point, the banker was sworn to secrecy.

So, the question remains, why the secrecy? The alleged Mr. Christian stated that keeping their group’s identity a secret would better allow people to respect the monument and its meaning without being distracted by pre-conceived notions regarding the group which initially commissioned the project. It is understood that the intention of this monument was to relay instructions, a new set of ten commandments, in the case that the world is destroyed. This speculative theory is based in the statement from Elberton Granite officials that Mr. Christian had stressed the importance of constructing the monument to be able to withstand the most catastrophic of events and that the message of the monument was intended to be used as guidelines for humanity to re-establish itself. This theory is further supported by the calendar and timekeeping use of the monument.

As I had mentioned previously, some of the mystery in this monument is based in controversy; this controversy is spawned from the message scrawled on both faces of each tablet in varying languages. This seems to have been done to ensure that any survivors of an apocalyptic event, regardless of nationality, could read the transcribed message in any of the following languages: English, Spanish, Swahili, Hebrew, Hindi, Chinese, Russian, and Arabic. The guidelines, or new ten commandments, are listed as follows:

1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
2. Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity.
3. Unite humanity with a living new language.
4. Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason.
5. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
6. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
7. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
8. Balance personal rights with social duties.
9. Prize truth — beauty — love — seeking harmony with the infinite.
10. Be not a cancer on the earth — Leave room for nature — Leave room for nature.

The third through tenth guidelines are logical and seem to fit many religious and political views regarding continuation and sustainment of our species. However, the first and second have a lot of controversy surrounding them. My personal take on the intention of these monuments being post-apocalyptic use specifically suggests that the first rule would be significantly less of an issue than people seem to want to make out of it – if these new commandments were to be rigorously implemented, the first guideline would suggest that we would have to reduce our global population down to 1/14. However, after the world has ended and society is working to rebuild, it is highly likely that less than 500 million people would survive.

Additionally, the second guideline suggests that the re-appropriation of humanity should be a result of guided reproduction. This is obviously controversial, as it would suggest that free will wouldn’t be fully implemented in the new society, and seems to follow some guidelines of Nazism.

Due to the secrecy associated with the “Small Group of American’s” responsible for this creation, as well as the messages listed and the seeming blasphemy of over-writing “God’s Ten Commandments” has some people making accusations against this group. Some say that these Guidestones are the creation of a “Luciferian secret society” or are based in devil worship. Others have even taken to referring to this monument as the “Ten Commandments of the Antichrist”.

From what I can see, my belief is leaning toward good-intending civilians, possibly descendants of Druidism. It looks to me that most of these commandments are based in unity with one another as well as with nature and that the intention of these commandments is to help guide a society with no historical record in preventing making the same mistakes which our world has made, and is currently making. “Leave room for nature” even seems to be repeated for emphasis. Either way, whoever is responsible, I believe they had the best of intentions in mind; it is said that 20 years went into designing this monument prior to its erection in 1980, and it seems to me that they chose what they believed to be the best thing to pass on to our future generations as advice.



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Nick Harding

Nick Harding

I'm an automation engineer who started out with just a drafting degree, but didn't want to stop learning. Ideally every day I find someone who needs help and do whatever I can to make their day. I enjoy expressing myself, whether it's through writing, story telling, singing or playing guitar; I love to teach others, as well as myself. My strongest drive is the interest in learning everything I can know, and speculating on topics that I can't. I know many people will react with the question, "an engineer with an open mind!?" Yes, I find it hard to disbelieve the things which we can see - since I am able to see energy, I am able to consider other potentials which are also deemed "non-scientific".