How to Stop Overthinking and Live a More Carefree Life

///How to Stop Overthinking and Live a More Carefree Life

how to stop overthinking

If you wonder how to stop overthinking, you may want to consider the following solutions, which may sound obvious but are actually effective.

Everybody overthinks. It’s human nature. Whether you consider yourself a positive or negative person, an introvert or an extrovert, a worrier or a calm soul, chances are you overthink from time to time.

For some people, this can become a bad habit that causes anxiety and stress or adds to mental health issues such as depression, and for others, it can simply be an annoyance that they wish they could stop.

Well, here are some tips on how to stop overthinking and live a more carefree life:

1. Pinpoint your overthinking

If you’re like me, you usually overthink at certain times of the day. For me, it’s when I go to bed. Once all of the business of the day has calmed down and I’m settling down to sleep, my brain goes into overdrive and I begin to overthink things that happened throughout the day and conversations I had.

Identifying when you are overthinking is one of the first steps to overcoming the habit. If you only overthink in certain situations, pinpoint exactly what those situations are, what they have in common and when you feel yourself overthinking, remind yourself that you need to simplify things in your mind.

2. Think positive

Being an overthinker can often mean you’re hard on yourself and end up kicking yourself for things you’ve done or haven’t done.

When you feel this happening, force yourself to think of a positive from that situation and focus on that one thing, instead of the negative things you’re overthinking about. If you overthink about potential situations that haven’t happened yet, force yourself to think about the best possible outcome instead of the worst.

At first, it may be hard to realise you’re doing it and purposefully think positive, but if you do it often enough, it will become a natural habit that won’t require any thought.

3. Stay busy

Staying busy is one of the most helpful things to do when you’re overthinking, although it can sometimes only be a temporary fix.

If you just can’t stop thinking about something in particular and you’re dwelling on it, do something that will make you think instead. Try reading a book, doing a puzzle or watching a movie.

If none of these things help, try putting on some music and sorting out your closet. Anything to keep your body and mind busy will do the trick.

Are you an avid overthinker like me? Do you have your own recommendations on how to stop overthinking? If you found these tips helpful, I’d love to know in the comments.

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Christina

I'm a psychology student with a passion for books, good food and movies. I can often be found reading self-help articles snuggled up in bed with a cup of coffee or writing about anything and everything in a quiet cafe somewhere.




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By | 2017-05-18T18:19:05+00:00 March 28th, 2016|Categories: Personal Development, Self-Improvement|Tags: , , |7 Comments

7 Comments

  1. PETERS March 29, 2016 at 1:26 am - Reply

    I’ve got 3 more to the list:
    1. Engaging mind in the exercises(meditation, visualisation, brainwave synchronisers, whatever makes to lower frequency of the brain from beta to alpha)
    2. L-Theanine or green tea (affects GABA and slows down the brain) and avoidance of MSG and other excessive glutamate sources
    3. Engaging body in the exercises.

    • Mike March 30, 2016 at 9:13 am - Reply

      I was going to say 1. and 3. When I can’t sleep due to overthinking, I force myself to think of absolutely nothing. Every time a thought or worry begins to brew, I tell myself, “peace” to kill the thought. This word, I’ve found, works the best in squashing thoughts without generating new ones. With practice you can begin to focus intently on nothing, and from there, sleep is a wish easily granted. Practice.

  2. PatC March 30, 2016 at 4:54 am - Reply

    I’m a compulsive worrier. I always dwell on the negatives of past situations and about upcoming events. It always eats up my insides. At bedtime is exactly when I grind about these things. I found regular exercise really helps such as my daily 3 mile fitness walks. I greatly appreciate the tips in your article.

  3. Thea Dunlap April 4, 2016 at 4:14 am - Reply

    I’m the type of person who always overthinks when pressured. Thank you for this helpful article. 🙂

  4. xandrim sevilla December 28, 2016 at 5:51 pm - Reply

    can’t control my thoughts and making me absent minded even in my job, before slept at night it takes 1-4hr before slept

  5. Verona June 5, 2017 at 6:41 am - Reply

    Exceptional post but I was wondering if you could write
    a litte more on this subject? I’d be very grateful if you could elaborate a little
    bit more. Bless you!

  6. Caridad July 8, 2017 at 11:54 pm - Reply

    Greetings! Very useful advice in ths particular article!
    It is the little chqnges that will make the biggest changes.
    Thanks a lot for sharing!

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